Pages

TDA7297 Zebrawood Amplifier (Sold to Louis in Wynnewood, PA)

The TDA7297 is a 15 watt per channel integrated circuit made by ST Electronics.  It is a class A/B amplifier and the first I've used from ST Electronics.  It has short circuit and overload protection. There is a lengthy thread about this circuit on the diy audio forum with many reports on it's wonderful sonics.  I equipped this one with a VALAB 23 step ladder style attenuator (which I love),  Wima polyester film input capacitors, Cat 6e plenum grade signal wiring, gold plated RCA connectors, gold plated five way binding posts and a nice Nichicon 2200uf power supply capacitor.    The chassis is a Hammond hand brushed aluminum 7" x 7" with a zebra wood veneer on the top.  Four machined, gold plated, aluminum isolation cones provide the support on the bottom.








5 comments:

mniec said...

Hi there, what is the best sounding Fleawatt so far?
Could you please post a link to purchase a module?

Audio Tweak.net said...

Hi there, what is the best sounding Fleawatt so far?
Could you please post a link to purchase a module?

Fleawatt said...

I don't really think there is a "best". They are kind of like different types of wine. Different flavors, but the ones that have a decent reputation, all sound good in their own special way. It also really depends on your speakers, room, musical tastes, etc. I can highly recommend both the TDA3116 & TDA7297. The 3116 is class D and has a bit more power/efficiency. The 7297 is very balanced, but needs a 12 volt supply of at least 3 amps.

GREG PEYTON said...

To add my experience, just today, I tried a less expensive T-AMP that sounded better than I ever would have imagined. First thought that I had was about the power supply, since it is only rated for .5 amps, and is a switching type of supply. Looks like I might be able to supply it with D cell batteries? If not that route, then is there a point to upgrading to a bigger non-switching power supply? More than likely you have experience with this.

Fleawatt said...

Greg, The T-Amps use a ntegrated circuit manufactured by the Tripath Corporation. Indeed, they are nice sounding chips and I've owned quite a lot of them. However, many describe them as sounding a bit lean and dry in comparison to the Texas Instruments Class D chips. Give one a try, since they aren't expensive. The 3116 boards are available for under $20. A 12 volt sealed lead acid battery is an inexpensive way to try battery power. External switching power supply quality varies quite a bit. There are varying opinions on power supplies, but I believe a good quality switching supply can provide excellent sound since these circuits don't draw much power.